Philadelphia Reflections

The musings of a physician who has served the community for over six decades

Related Topics

Benjamin Franklin :Topic 6 : Blog 1970 : Blog 4348 : Blog 4349 : Blog 3771 :
A collection of Benjamin Franklin tidbits that relate Philadelphia's revolutionary prelate to his movi ng around the city, the colonies, and the worldBlog 2331: Blog 4349: Topic 6 :

Franklin in London: 18 yrs:1758-1775
Franklin lived 18 years in London as the famous scientist and high-living emissary of the Pennsylvania and Massachusetts colonies. But it all ended bitterly.(Topic 661)

New Topic 13 2020-09-10 15:40:19 Franklin Inn Club : Topic 13 :
Hidden in a back street near the theaters, this little club is the center of the city's literary circle. It enjoys above-average food in surroundings suggesting Samuel Johnson's club in London.

Insurance in Philadelphia
Early Philadelphia took a lead in insurance innovation. Some ideas, like life insurance, flourished. Others have faded.

Food and Drink in Philadelphia
A flowing abundance of food sources made Philadelphia the capital of food and drink, right from earliest times.

Literary Philadelphia
Literary

The French and Indian War
DESCRIPTION: this is where you put a small summary blurb which appears in the section surrounded by a black box.

New topic 26 TITLE 26: Topic 673: Topic 26: Topic 673: 18 Years in London, Ending Abruptly :
DESCRIPTION: this is where you put a small summary blurb which appears in the section surrounded by a black box.

A short book about the Franklin Inn of Philadelphia
In honor of the Franklin Inn, I collated blogs that I have written or read over the years. But because of Covid, the Inn is having membership problems, so this volume is my gift to the membership as a way of stimulating membership to new efforts for old times. George Ross Fisher III

Madeira Party 2009: Franklin Mistakes Lead Poisoning For Gout.

{Madeira Wine }
Madeira Wine

The hundred years war, the thirty years war, the seven years war, and other European disagreements made it difficult to import wine to England, deflecting the wine import trade to Portugal. Port wine was, of course, prominent, but the best wine of all came from the Portuguese colony of Madeira. The island of Madeira is closer to Africa than to Portugal, so the triangular slave trade made it easy to import Madeira wine to the British colonies in America. The eastern seaboard of America had no grape culture of any note, so the beverage trade centered on rum, whiskey, beer, and Madeira. George Washington is widely reported to have had half a bottle of Madeira every day for lunch, for example.

{S. Weir Mitchell. Mitchell}
S. Weir Mitchell

The other evening at the Franklin Inn Club, a traditional Philadelphia Madeira party filled the hall, and the membership was brought up to date on some of the traditions and finer points of the occasion. In the first place, the Franklin Inn was founded by S. Weir Mitchell who spent his spare time as Father of Neurology, had written a short story called The Madeira Party which worked in a large number of details about what was what about Madeira, ending with ribald tipsiness. Nathan Siven, a well-known wine authority, instructed the group in the various types of grape and vintage, and other members who have summered in Madeira related current conditions. Because the volcanic island is a favorite place for visitors, particularly Englishmen, real estate is at such a premium that most vineyards have only one or two acres of grapes. The wineries whose names are on the bottles pick up the crop from these local growers and take it on from there. This seems as good as any other explanation for the current high prices of the wine. However, a century ago a disease wiped out the French and Portuguese vineyards, who were forced to beg back some exported grapevines from California to get back in business. So, one wonders about the scarcity claim.

{Madeira in a barrels}
Madeira in a Barrel

It is related that a number of cargoes of Madeira, particularly those of John Hancock of Boston were caught being smuggled to the colonies, and got returned. It was discovered that the taste of the wine was greatly improved by the tumult so that each vintner experimented with various methods of agitating and heating the wine to produce a particular brand. Madeira, like sherry, is a fortified wine, with various proportions of grain alcohol and brandy added in secret formulas. On one point there is general agreement, that if fortified wines are aged for long enough periods, eventually they all taste alike. There thus has emerged the tricky business of aging the wine long enough for the vintage of the wine to match the age or anniversary of the person being honored by the gift. Fifty years is the tricky goal; it's the most popular gift, but perilously close to the point where you can't tell if it is sherry or Madeira. There are four main varieties of Madeira (brand names are something else), getting progressively sweeter, darker colored, and more expensive as they age. Malmsey, in a barrel of which Shakspere portrayed the royal princes being drowned, is claimed to be the very best. Some people regard it as too sweet, however. At a proper Madeira party, each variety is served with a different course of terrapin or whatever. The President of the Franklin Inn read off the instructions for cooking the traditional first course of jellied boiled boar's head, and the guests agreed that modern tastes called for a substitute. After the reading of Mitchell's short story, the group added a new tradition of singing Flanders and Swann's ribald song, "Have Some Madeira, m'dear".

Chuck Barber, recent President of the Green Tree Insurance Company, added an entirely new historical slant. The Insurance Company is well known for having the best dinner in town at its meetings since directors of insurance companies don't do much. At the dinner in 1799, the news was brought in that George Washington had just died. A member rose to propose what has become an annual toast using Madeira, "To President Washington!" In time, S. Weir Mitchell became a member of the board, and the famous short story was the outcome that firmly fixed the rules of the Philadelphia Madeira Party. Bill Madeira was called on to verify this history, but he protested that his family name was derived from the wine, not the other way around.

It seems appropriate to add another historical note. Benjamin Franklin, after whom the club is named, suffered severely from gout. Although some sort of association with liquor had been mentioned as far back as Hippocrates, Franklin's powers of observation and his fame as a scientist placed him in a position to make it an irrefutable doctrine that gout was a medical penalty for drinking liquor. It was, of course, Madeira that old Ben was drinking, and it was the rule that Madeira was transported in lead-lined kegs. The Green Tree has some of the old kegs if you doubt it. Franklin's observation was acute, but what he was reporting was the effect of the lead poisoning, not of the wine.

Originally published: Sunday, June 21, 2009; most-recently modified: Wednesday, February 03, 2021

I must admit, the webmaster is a cool guy..!!
Posted by: followers exchanege   |   Feb 13, 2012 9:51 AM
Yeah, it is clear now !... From the very beginning I did not understand where was the connection with the title !!....
Posted by: cheapostay discount   |   Feb 13, 2012 9:29 AM
Interesting, but still I would like to know more about it. Liked the article:DD
Posted by: esalerugs coupons   |   Feb 13, 2012 9:08 AM
According to the recipe from S. Weir Mitchell's cook, the dish is a "calves head terrapin."
Posted by: Deborah Goldstein   |   Jul 21, 2009 1:41 PM
Thank you, George. You saved me from missing Malmsey in this too-brief lifetime.
Posted by: charles Kelly   |   Jun 29, 2009 11:22 PM

Please Let Us Know What You Think

 
 

(HTML tags provide better formatting)